AI Case Study

Verily aims to reduce infected mosquitos population with computer vision

Alphabet's Verily, a life sciences and healthcare company has partnered with Singapore's National Environment Agency on the agency's field study called "Project Wolbachia -- Singapore". The study is aimed at sing male Wolbachia-carrying mosquitoes to control the insect's population. Verily will help to stop mosquitos that carry viruses and diseases from breeding. The company leverages computer vision algorithm and artificial intelligence to reduce the time spent separating male and female mosquitoes manually.

Industry

Basic Materials

Agriculture

Project Overview

Verily, a life sciences and healthcare company under Google's parent company Alphabet, has partnered with Singapore's National Environment Agency to bring its mosquito sex-sorting technology to the city-state. The technology will be employed in the second phase of the agency's field study called "Project Wolbachia -- Singapore", which experiments with using male Wolbachia-carrying mosquitoes to control the insect's population.

This sex-sorting technology is developed under the Debug Project funded by Verily and uses a computer vision algorithm and artificial intelligence to cut down on the time spent separating male and female mosquitoes manually.

As part of the project, it was used to release over a million Wolbachia-infected male Aedes mosquitoes in communities in far north Queensland in Australia in April where Verily is partners with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the University of Queensland and James Cook University. These infected mosquitoes are sterile and do not bite or spread diseases but when they mate with female mosquitoes, the resulting eggs will fail to hatch, hence helping to suppress the population of the mosquitoes.

Reported Results

Planned; results not yet available

Technology

The sex-sorting technology uses a computer vision algorithm and artificial intelligence to cut down on the time spent separating male and female mosquitoes manually.

Function

R And D

Core Research And Development

Background

Artificial intelligence is now being deployed to help curb the breeding of Aedes mosquitoes, which are responsible for the spread of such diseases as dengue, yellow fever and the Zika virus.

Benefits

Data